Visual Meditation | Thanksgiving

November 26, 2020

This Contemplative Visual Meditation features this week's readings accompanied by images and music, and is prepared for us by Lisa Cerrina.

Hymn Meditation | Christ the King

November 24, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: King of Glory, King of Peace | GENERAL SEMINARY

17th century poet George Herbert was one of the most prolific and enduring sacred poets of his time. His text for this poem praises a King not of power or dominion, but one of peace and love. He writes about a deep relationship with a King that is nurturing, sustaining and sacrificing. The poem (from The Temple of 1633) contains seven stanzas, but one was omitted for the sake of singing. Echoing the title and spirit of the poem, the stanza that is missing is: Thou grew’st soft and moist with tears, Thou relendest: And when Justice call’d for fears, Thou disentedst. The broad, sweeping music that is in The Hymnal 1982 was written by David Charles Walker, a former priest in the Diocese of Los Angeles. He served in various ministries in Southern California, including All Souls’ Parish in Point Loma (San Diego), All Saints’ Parish (Beverly Hills) and as Chaplain at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles.

Hymn Meditation | Pentecost 24

November 17, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: Not Here for High and Holy Things | GORONATION (alt. tune)

If you were on the patio or watched the live stream this past Sunday, you’ll notice the text of this hymn is one we sang on Sunday. The tune, however, is different than what corresponds with the number in our hymnal. Music has the uncanny ability of setting text in a different context. Using this text with the tune Coronation allows the last verse of the text by Anglican Priest, Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy to not only live fresh, but carries the triumphant tone of giving thanks to God for our blessings as we share them with others. Often garnering him wild accusations, Studdert Kennedy rejected joining a political party and distrusted most politicians, simply believing that all people were of worth in God’s sight.

Hymn Meditation | Pentecost 23

November 10, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: Once He Came in Blessing | GOTTES SOHN IST GEKOMMEN

This hymn, not frequently sung by many Anglicans, is actually a hymn for the season of Advent. It’s still appropriate for the time late in the season of Pentecost, and especially in our world. We’re edging closer to a season of preparation for the birth of Christ, but were reminded in this week’s Gospel to “Keep awake, for you know neither the day nor the hour” (John 25:13) of his coming. This hymn reminds us to trust in the coming savior to free us from torment and heal us. Michael Weisse, a Bohemian Brethren Pastor, wrote the tune for this hymn. He was a contemporary of Martin Luther and was from a region in Silesia (modern day Poland). As always, we invite you to either sing along at home or just follow along with the text and music as you continue your week in prayer.

Hymn Meditation | All Saints

November 3, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: I Sing a Song of the Saints of God | GRAND ISLE

This past Sunday, we celebrated the Feast of All Saints, giving thanks for those holy people, both saints and ordinary folk, that have gone on to their great reward. We give thanks for the faithful cloud of witnesses that continue to lift and support us. Lesbia Scott’s poetry illuminates the cloud of witnesses in the variety of people that are counted among the saints. Though this hymn appeared in the 1940 Hymnal, it almost didn’t make it into The Hymnal 1982. The editors of the new hymnal didn’t see the merit of this hymn in the life of the church at the time. Fortunately for the hymn’s continued longevity, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church saw merit to this hymn and decided to include it in the new hymnal despite the editor’s objection. Many parishes (St. James' included) consider this hymn and Sine Nomine to be two of the hymns that must be included on All Saints' Day.

Hymn Meditation | Pentecost 21

October 27, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: I Bind Unto Myself Today | ST. PATRICK’S BREASTPLATE/DEIRDRE

The poetry of this hymn has its original form in a 9th century Celtic prayer. In the later part of the 19th century, Cecil Frances Alexander adapted it into the form we see today at the request of the Dean of the Chapel Royal at Dublin Castle in 1889. Comprising two Irish Melodies, this hymn was adapted and harmonized by two of the greatest composers of English Music: Charles Villiers Stanford and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Much has been written about the poetry used in this hymn. A favorite at St. James, the text invites us to bind ourselves to Christ through times of deep confusion and chaos. Search on this channel for the Rev. Canon Anne Tumilty’s sermon from this past Sunday to delve deeper into the texts that accompanied this great hymn.

Hymn Meditation | Pentecost 20

October 20, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: For the Fruits of all Creation | EAST ACKLAM

In the midst of all that is going on in the world, out stewardship theme this year encourages us to be Faithful Together. From the abundance of our living, we are invited to share what we have, being faithful together as a parish, in thanksgiving to the one who has provided so much to us. Fred Pratt Green’s text of this hymn is often thought of as a fall/harvest hymn. While the literal ideas of plowing, sowing and reaping may seem foreign to us in Los Angeles, they are a metaphor for what it means to be Faithful Together. If this hymn tune is new to you and you don’t have a hymnal at home, please listen and follow along with the text as you continue your week in prayer.

Hymn Meditation | Pentecost 19

October 13, 2020

Organist Jason Klein-Mendoza offers a weekly hymn reflection on last Sunday’s sermon. Hymn: All Creatures of our God and King | LASST UNS ERFREUEN

On Sunday, October 11, we celebrated the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi with a blessing of the animals. 2020 has been atypical for most people and this year’s blessing of the animals was held virtually. We extolled and remembered St. Francis and his love of all animals and nature. This hymn gives thanks for all of creation and praises God for the earth in its abundance of all living things.